Date nights for life

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There’s a lot of pressure to plan the perfect date night. But an evening to remember doesn’t have to break the bank. In fact, if you’re willing to get creative now, you can grow your savings to make sure you can have date nights now and later in life.

We’ve got some ideas to help get you started—including the average cost for each date. Our numbers are based on two adults and our totals have taxes included. These numbers also reflect the average cost across all four Atlantic provinces.

Dinner and a Movie

What’s a more classic date night than dinner and a movie? Pick your favourite restaurant, bask in the romantic candlelight, and have somebody else to do the cooking. Then, catch up on the latest blockbuster at the theatre.

TOTAL COST: $195 [1]

Outdoor Adventure

Lace up those skates or strap on some snowshoes! Most outdoor rinks and trails are inexpensive—if not free—to use, and most places also provide equipment to borrow.

After, you can warm up inside with a hot beverage and a sweet treat at a local coffee shop.

TOTAL COST: $15

Skiing

Make the most of the winter weather and hit the slopes! At the very least it’s a good excuse to enjoy a little aprés ski in the lodge when you’re finished. Some ski hills even offer 2 for 1 lift tickets during the week, so be sure to check!

TOTAL COST: $150[2]

Wine Tasting

Atlantic Canada is getting some serious attention when it comes to wine making. Take a trip to a local vineyard to learn about how wine is made and of course, sample some of the product.

TOTAL COST: $20

Cooking Classes

Get the skills you need to turn your next meal at home into a gourmet experience. Many local grocery stores host community cooking classes which are an affordable way to pick up some new recipes. Or you could go big and head straight to the experts—many top-rated chefs also offer cooking classes.

TOTAL COST: $46–$290

Dance Class

Hit the dance floor with confidence the next time you’re out—or even when you’re in your kitchen. Many dance studios offer a free drop in class to try, though most require a commitment of at least 10 weeks of lessons.

TOTAL COST: $370[3]

Couples Spa Day

Who doesn’t want an excuse to spend some time in a fluffy robe? Head to your local spa to experience the benefits of a little rest and relaxation together by booking a one-hour couples massage.                                   

TOTAL COST: $175

Romantic Dinner and Movie at Home

Of course, sometimes a night home is just as enjoyable as a night out on the town. Pick up some ingredients for your favourite meal (and a bottle of wine) and enjoy a romantic dinner for two. Then, curl up on the couch and binge watch some favourites on Netflix.

TOTAL COST: $65[4]

Or, you could take some (or all) of that money and put it into your RRSP or TFSA. If you add up the cost of all the dates, it’s approximately $1,280. Based on a return of 4% per year, after 10 years, if you invested $1,280, you could have $1,894.71[5]. That’s $614.71 in your pocket!

[1] Based on shared appetizer, 2 entrees, 1 glass of wine each, dessert and coffee, two movie tickets, 1 large popcorn, 2 soft drinks and candy.
[2]  Lift ticket with equipment rental for two people = $150. Lift ticket without equipment rental = $103.
[3] Based on 10 weeks of dance lessons.
[4] Based on groceries, and monthly Netflix subscription.
[5] The math:

A – Amount accumulated after n years
r = annual rate of interest (as a decimal)
t = number of years invested
n = number of times the interest compounds (use 1 for annually)

A = P(1+r/n)nt
A = 1280(1+0.4/1)(1)(10)
A = 1280(1.04)10
A = 1280(1.48024428)
A = 1894.71

[1] Based on shared appetizer, 2 entrees, 1 glass of wine each, dessert and coffee, two movie tickets, 1 large popcorn, 2 soft drinks and candy.
[2]  Lift ticket with equipment rental for two people = $150. Lift ticket without equipment rental = $103.
[3] Based on 10 weeks of dance lessons.
[4] Based on groceries, and monthly Netflix subscription.
[5] The math:

A – Amount accumulated after n years
r = annual rate of interest (as a decimal)
t = number of years invested
n = number of times the interest compounds (use 1 for annually)

A = P(1+r/n)nt
A = 1280(1+0.4/1)(1)(10)
A = 1280(1.04)10
A = 1280(1.48024428)
A = 1894.71